Elbow

Cubital Tunnel Syndrome

Cubital tunnel syndrome, also called ulnar nerve entrapment is a condition caused by compression of the ulnar nerve in an area of the elbow called the cubital tunnel. The ulnar nerve travels down the back of the elbow behind the bony bump called the medial epicondyle and through a passageway called the cubital tunnel. The cubital tunnel is a narrow passageway on the inside of the elbow formed by bone, muscle, and ligaments with the ulnar nerve passing through its centre.

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Tennis elbow/Lateral Epicondylitis

Tennis elbow is the common name used for the elbow condition called lateral epicondylitis. It is an overuse injury that causes inflammation of the tendons that attach to the bony prominence on the outside of the elbow (lateral epicondyle).It is a painful condition occurring from repeated muscle contractions at the forearm that leads to inflammation and micro tears in the tendons that attach to the lateral epicondyle.

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Golfers elbow/Medial Epicondylitis

Golfer’s elbow, also called Medial Epicondylitis, is a painful condition occurring from repeated muscle contractions in the forearm that leads to inflammation and microtears in the tendons that attach to the medial epicondyle. The medial epicondyle is the bony prominence that is felt on the inside of the elbow.

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Olecranon bursitis

The elbow contains a large, curved, pointy bone at the back called the olecranon, which is covered by the olecranon bursa, a small fluid-filled sac that allows smooth movement between the bone and overlying skin. Inflammation of this bursa leads to a condition called olecranon bursitis.

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Olecranon Fractures

An elbow fracture results from a break or crack in one or more of the bones that make up the elbow joint. There are two types of elbow fractures:

  • Extra-articular fractures that include intercondylar fractures, supracondylar fractures, epicondylar fractures, and condyle fractures
  • Intra-articular fractures that include trochlea and capitellum fractures, radial head, and proximal ulnar fractures

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Radial Head Fractures

The elbow joint is formed by the junction of the humerus (upper arm bone), and radius and ulna (forearm bones). The radius is the shorter of the two forearm bones and can be divided into the head, neck and body. The radial head articulates with the humerus and ulna to form the elbow joint. When you reach out to try to break a fall, the head of the radius is often the area that fractures. Radial head fractures are common injuries that occur more frequently in women.

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  • American Academy of Arthopaedic Surgeons
  • American Society For Surgery of The Hand
  • Society of The State of New York
  • Medical Society of The County of Westchester